Blog: Real Moms Real Stories

9 Quick Breastfeeding Tips for First Time Moms

9 Quick Breastfeeding Tips for First Time Moms

By Susan Tanner   New mothers may find breastfeeding confusing at first. You may not know exactly what to do or how to do it. Hopefully these breastfeeding tips will help to get you started.   * Start Early – It is good to begin breastfeeding within an hour after birth if possible, when your baby is alert and the instinct to suck is strong. Although you will not yet be producing milk, your breasts contain colostrum, a thin milky fluid that contains important antibodies to disease. * Feed Frequently – You should try breastfeeding your baby at least every two to three hours. This will help to keep your breasts soft and lessen or even prevent engorgement. Watch for signs that your baby is hungry, such as changes in facial expressions, sucking sounds or lip movements, and rapid eye movement or restlessness during light naps. If you keep an eye out for these signs, you can learn to anticipate your baby’s hunger. Breastfeeding on cue will help stimulate your breasts to produce more milk. * Good Positioning – Having the right positioning for breastfeeding will play a major role in reducing nipple soreness. Use you hand to support the baby’s neck. The baby’s mouth should be open wide with the lips puckered out like “fish lips”, not folded in. The nipple should go back as far into his or her mouth as possible. If you need help finding the proper positioning, ask a nurse, midwife, or other experienced mother for some help breastfeeding. * Nipple Upkeep – When you first begin breastfeeding your nipples may become very sore.... read more
Breasts engorgement : What to expect

Breasts engorgement : What to expect

Adapted from whattoexpect.com Right after you give birth, your hormones undergo a major shift — say bye-bye to estrogen and progesterone, and hello to prolactin, the milk-producing hormone. This change causes your postpartum breasts to grow even bigger (is this possible?) and more tender (more tender?!!) than they were during pregnancy. Welcome to the world of engorgement, which begins around two to five days after delivery whether you’re planning to nurse or not. The sinister side effects: rock-hard breasts that are swollen and wickedly uncomfortable. This is pain with a gain, though, since engorgement is a sign that your breasts are filling up with the milk your baby needs. The increased blood flow to your breasts (necessary to get the milk-producing factory up and running) is also adding to the pain and swelling. WILL ENGORGEMENT EVER END? Fortunately, engorgement is temporary, and assuming you get started breastfeeding right away (the earlier the better for relief), the pain and hardness should diminish within two to three days. By the time your baby and your breasts devise a good supply-and-demand relationship (usually within a few weeks), the engorgement will have diminished completely. If you’re not nursing, it’ll decrease within a few days. WHAT TO DO ABOUT BREAST ENGORGEMENT IF YOU’RE NURSING. Until your milk supply-and-demand cycle is well established, take these steps to minimize discomfort: Feed your baby frequently (every two to three hours) to encourage the demand to keep up with the supply. The less your baby feeds, the more engorged your breasts will become. The more your baby feeds, the quicker engorgement will pass (pretty strong motivation, right?). Place... read more
Stretch Marks & Skin Changes in Pregnancy

Stretch Marks & Skin Changes in Pregnancy

by Sharon Hopkins There are countless physical changes to your skin, both pleasurable and painful attributed to your pregnancy only. The common skin change that most pregnant woman experience is stretch marks. Stretch marks are separations of the outer layers of skin caused by the overstretching of underlying layers. The most commonly affected areas by stretch marks are hips, abdomen, breasts, thighs and buttocks. Stretch marks are itchy reddish marks. In pregnancy, heredity plays an important role in determining who will have and will not have stretch marks. If your mother has had them, chances are that you will get them too. There is no sure shot remedy for stretch marks, though some do fade after delivery. The only way to avoid stretch marks is to prevent them. We recommend the following – – Massage vitamin E or olive oil on the abdomen areas from the start of your pregnancy. Massage it liberally over the marks after a shower. In case you skip a shower, clean the area with a wet cloth and then apply the oil. – Regular exercise helps to tone your muscles and keep your skin firm. – Maintain healthy diet and drink plenty of water. Plenty of proteins and vitamin C & E foods should be included in your diet. Increase your intake of minerals such as zinc and silica to maintain healthy skin. – One ounce of sweet almond or jojoba oil with 7-8 drops of lavender and chamomile oils is a good homemade recipe. – Avoid excessive weight gain in a short time span. – Cocoa butter reduces stretch marks and helps to... read more
Suffering from Early Pregnancy Back Pain?

Suffering from Early Pregnancy Back Pain?

by: Saurabh Jain Normal and Short-term Phenomenon Early pregnancy back pain is a normal phenomenon in early pregnancy and it generally subsides after about 20 weeks. Back pain or spasm, which is reflected by stretching of muscles or burning pain in the left or the right side of the quadrant, is normally the result of the softening of the supporting ligaments and disks due to an increase in the progesterone hormone. In some cases, urinary infection can also result in back pain amongst pregnant women. The extra weight of a pregnant women’s body and the change in her centre of gravity also result in backaches and back pain. The most important remedy for curing early pregnancy back pain is exercising. Walking, pelvic rocking, bridging (done by laying on the floor, bending your knees and lifting your buttocks into air), mini-crunches (done by laying on the floor), bending your knees and lifting your head on exhalation, are good exercises for pregnant women and can go a long way in relieving a back pain. The right body posture and good body mechanics also play an important role in keeping one free of early pregnancy back pain. The right posture means standing straight and tall and is as essential in early pregnancy as before that. However, in late pregnancy, as the uterus becomes big, one tends to pull back her shoulders to offset the additional weight, which results in a back strain. One can reduce back pain in such a position by frequently changing her sitting position and avoiding standing for long periods. Adequate rest and sleep are also essential for avoiding... read more
“Help! My baby is crying!”

“Help! My baby is crying!”

“Why does my Baby cry? What can I do?”

Every new mum and dad ask themselves frantically when their newborn cry. Most parents with newborns carry the expectation that being good parents mean having happy babies all the time (Smiling babies is what everyone usually see in all the baby magazines…)

The reality is that babies have to cry.

Remember: Crying is the first form of baby talk. Crying is a normal event in the lives of all babies. When a baby comes out of the womb, the first thing she does is cry




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Are You Experiencing Anemia During Pregnancy?

Are You Experiencing Anemia During Pregnancy?

by Susan Tanner Anemia during pregnancy is most commonly caused by an iron deficiency. Being tested for anemia early in your pregnancy is a good idea, but may not be enough, since anemia may still develop as your pregnancy progresses. Although anemia is caused by an iron deficiency in your body, you will not need to worry too much about your baby, since he will be sure to get as much iron from you as he needs. Your baby will only be in danger of suffering from anemia if the situation is completely ignored. How will I be able to tell if I am anemic? Anemia should be easily identifiable in the blood tests that you take frequently throughout your pregnancy. The baby will start drawing on your iron reserves much more heavily around week 20, so you may develop anemia later in your pregnancy. Common symptoms of anemia during pregnancy include: * Feeling exhausted or weak * Pale or light skin * Fainting spells * Palpitations * Breathlessness Who is most at risk? Pregnant women who have poor nutrition, due to nausea and vomiting or simply bad habits, are more at risk of developing anemia. Also, women who are carrying multiple fetuses may be at a higher risk, as two babies will deplete iron stores twice as much. Women who have two or more pregnancies relatively close together may be at risk for similar reasons. How much iron should I be getting? The recommended daily allowance of iron is around 15mg for women trying to conceive. Pregnant women will need to consume about twice that much each day.... read more

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