Debunking 7 Biggest Breastfeeding Myths

Debunking 7 Biggest Breastfeeding Myths

Breastfeeding is always a hot topic and while there is plenty of scientific literature available on the subject, there are still a number of myths that continue to circulate. If you are currently a nursing mother or plan to be after the birth of your baby, you can rest assured that the following 7 myths are NOT true. Here are 7 myths dispelled. Myth #1: Babies who are frequently breastfeed grow into obese children. Actually, the opposite is true. Babies who are weaned from breastfeeding early and fed formula over-enthusiastically are more likely to be obese later in life. Breastfed babies learn to regulate their own feeding pattern and stop eating when they are full and have consumed all they need. Myth #2: Breastfeeding causes your breast to sag. Wrong! While pregnancy does cause some changes in your breast, breastfeeding doesn’t play a significant role in determining your breast’s shape in the future. However, your body type, heredity, and excess weight loss and gain do have a role. Myth #3: If you are planning to go back to work, you can’t breastfeed. Yes, you can. Breastfeeding gives you an opportunity to bond with your baby, even after you have returned to work. In fact, babies who are breastfed tend to healthier than those who are fed formula meaning moms miss work less often. When you are not with your baby, pumping is an option. A number of companies allow nursing breaks and even have facilities, such as lactation rooms, where the mom can pump in private. Myth #4: You won’t make enough milk. Rarely is this the case. For...
Top 10 Breastfeeding Tips From Moms

Top 10 Breastfeeding Tips From Moms

Here’s a collection of breastfeeding tips from our mom community – tell us in the comments what are some of your tips and tricks for successful breastfeeding! 1. Don’t be too hard on yourself. My baby has reflux and dr recommended express pumping milk then mixing with a thickening powder to help keep the milk from spitting up. Started doing this when he was 2 wks old and he now prefers the bottle rather than latching on. I felt guilty and sad he didn’t want to latch on but baby not wanting to breastfeed is not a reflection of whether you are a “bad” or “incapable” mother. It is merely different ways of feeding and caring for your baby. You are still able to bond through bottle feeding, and with a lot of persistence and patience he now latches on half the time and bottle feeds the other half. Not latching on or breastfeeding does not mean your baby doesn’t love you or has not bonded with you.  So just like there are different ways to make a baby (intercourse, IVF, surrogacy, adoption…etc) there are also ways of feeding a baby, us parents should all be supportive of each other. – Junia 2. Prepare for nipple chafing. One thing I wished one gotten in preparation was the breast shells/shields. They would have helped a lot to protect my nipples from chafing in the first few weeks. 😉 – Mei 3. Must understand the basic lactation principle: it’s like the sponge- you squeeze out more, leaving more space in the ducts then only can produce more. So try to empty breast...
Michelle’s Breastfeeding Journey

Michelle’s Breastfeeding Journey

One of the greatest joys of breastfeeding is the bond between my son and I. I love the feeling of indulging in holding him against my chest, smelling his powdery baby scent; it is a time where I get a chance to take a short breather and enjoy a small pocket of solitude with him throughout the day. When I first started out breastfeeding, I was faced with the usual challenges of cracked nipples, engorgement – I had mastitis as well. I was sorely tempted to give up direct latching my baby and maybe even breastfeeding as well. Lucky for me, I have a very supportive husband and friends. With their encouragement, I decided to hang in there and continue direct latching my baby. I have to admit, the thought of not having to wash and sterilise bottles and pumps throughout the day was a substantial part in motivating me to direct latch. 🙂 Breastfeeding became a breeze after almost 2 months. Its been 7 months already and I am still breastfeeding. I’m so glad I decided to hang in there and chose not to give up direct latching. After toughing it out the first 2 months, life is really much easier especially in the middle of the night and when going out – without the need of carrying milk bottles, formula and hot water flasks – I can just feed my baby anywhere. Being a mom has taught me to become a more patient and tolerant person. Granted, with just my husband and I taking care of a baby on our own, it’s really no easy task. After...
10 Must-Have Tools for Breastfeeding

10 Must-Have Tools for Breastfeeding

When it comes to breastfeeding your child, there are some definite must-haves that you should invest in. This is especially true when planning on returning to work, or sharing the feeding schedule with another family member, since these must-have products are designed to make things easier for you. Breast Milk Pump If you are planning to return to work, yet still want to continue breastfeeding your infant, then a breast milk pump is an essential must-have. A hand pump is fine for the infrequent use in the comfort of your own home, but investing in a double electric pump for more frequent uses will make things easier for you. You should also get an extra set of pump parts, so you can have a clean set ready while you wash the other set. Water Bottle Having a bottle of water close at hand when breastfeeding is critical. Breastfeeding mothers should ensure that they stay hydrated. Choose a BPA-free option with an easy spout, so you can keep one hand on your water bottle, and the other on your baby. Nursing Dresses Want to look beautiful, yet still be comfortable and maintain easy access for nursing? Nursing dresses are the solution you are looking for! One of the best options is the Alana Summer Tier Nursing Dress (Sunset) from Annee Matthew. It’s striking, flattering, and incredibly practical. The empire line band sits just under your breasts, and allows easy breastfeeding access. Breast Milk Storage If you’re pumping to feed your baby later on, you will need a secure storage for it. Stacking up on breast milk storage bags is essential...
Nursing on the Go

Nursing on the Go

Modern mamas often love to travel and be on the go. Traveling while nursing a baby does not have to take away from the fun of your vacation if you are fully prepared. Whether traveling by car, train or plane, having the right nursing wear is crucial for your comfort and your baby’s. With the right gear, you will be fully prepared to meet the nutritional needs of your baby without having to compromise your comfort or style. Wearing clothing that is meant for nursing makes feeding your baby much easier and less stressful. Today’s nursing dresses and tops are meant to make nursing much easier and more discreet – very important, especially if you are visiting countries that are more conservative. Fortunately, there are many different options for nursing wear that allow for easy access to the breasts while helping nursing mamas breastfeed in public confidently. Understanding the different types of clothing for nursing can help a woman to choose carefully. – Pull down or pull aside types typically feature a V-neck or rounded neck. The top can be pulled down on either side so it is below the breast. These types of tops or dresses often feature a bra liner so the entire breast is not exposed. The Annee Matthew Double V-Neck Nursing Tank is a great example of how this type of garment works. The woman simply pulls the V-neck down to expose her breast enough for her baby to latch on. This stylish number can be worn alone or with a light jacket. – Another type of Nursing wear garment is a pull-up or empire...
Annie’s Motherhood Journey: Part 1

Annie’s Motherhood Journey: Part 1

Annie is the founder of AnneeMatthew. In part 1, she shares her story on the personal challenges she faced as a mother, lessons she learnt from her own mom, as well as the joys that motherhood brings! My breastfeeding journey: I had my son in 1997. I had read a lot on breastfeeding prior to giving birth but I didn’t know of another mom who had solely breastfed her child. Everything I’d learnt was through books (Internet was at its infancy still back then). I managed to breastfeed my son for 6 months before I put him on formula. I was afraid of his bite when he started teething at 6 months but looking back, it was more of my anticipation of the pain more than anything else! Soon after, he developed allergic rhinitis. He would vomit after most meals because he couldn’t handle the mucus that had accumulated in his breathing passage. For some time, the sound of his cough was the most fearsome thing ever! Because the vomit would follow! Once after breakfast, he started coughing in church and vomited all over the church goers in the next seat. Due to his condition, his paediatrician advised me to breastfeed for as long as possible with his sister. My daughter was born in 2000. I took the paediatrician’s advice and breastfed her for 2 years. It was such a rewarding experience. I was fortunate because I had plenty of milk and never had any complications. My breasts were engorged all the time. I was pumping and at times, force feeding her just to be relieved of the pressure!...
10 Methods to Store Breast Milk

10 Methods to Store Breast Milk

We know that as a busy mom, you may not be able to stay home with your baby all day. Jobs and other commitments make it necessary to express and store breast milk for use while away from your little ones. So as a handy reminder, we’ve compiled a list of 10 tips and tricks for storing breast milk well, to ensure the best quality milk for your baby. 1. Room temperature storage Breast milk can be safely stored in sterilized containers and kept at room temperature which is between 66 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit (or 18 – 25 deg C) for between 4-6 hours. This is an acceptable alternative when you are only going to be gone for a few hours. 2. Insulated cooling bag storage Expressed breast milk may be stored in an insulated cooler bag for up to 24 hours. Store expressed milk in sterilized containers and surrounded by ice packs inside the zipped cooler bag. The temperature should not rise above 39 degrees Fahrenheit (or 3 deg C). 3. Refrigerator method Place your expressed breast milk in sterilized containers. Store it at the back part of the refrigerator which is kept at a maximum of 39 degrees F (3 deg C). While this method of storage is optimal for keeping breastmilk fresh for 72 hours, it is still acceptable to store breast milk in this manner for up to 8 days. 4. Refrigerator freezer at 5 degrees F. You can also store breast milk in the freezer compartment of your refrigerator. The recommended temperature is at around 5 degrees F. The maximum recommended storage time...
Mabel’s Motherhood Journey

Mabel’s Motherhood Journey

“Both elder brothers dote on the little one very much. We are one big family!” Mabel is a nurse and has three sons aged 11, 8 and 1.5 years old. She shares some of her greatest joys and challenges of motherhood so far. 1. Greatest joys All my three boys are strong and robust – and I believe breast milk is the most natural source of all the vitamins and minerals a baby requires, even past six months old! Seeing my kids grow healthy is no secondary joy to the bonding that I’ve had with them through breastfeeding. My husband has also always commented that I have that kind of “aura” when I breastfeed my kids – imagine that classic image of a mom gently looking into baby’s eyes while feeding… I feel the more milk I give my kids, the more love I pass on. 2. Greatest challenges This has got to be all the initial struggles! Regardless of how experienced a mummy is, each child behaves differently and the breastfeeding journey is never smooth sailing for all. I had mastitis with fever, I had lacerated nipples with raw skin exposed. The pain I went through is unimaginable, but, it only takes a mum’s love to overcome all these. Therefore I could still crawl up in the middle of the night to feed my son, crying and tolerating the pain… 3. What helped you on your breastfeeding journey? The most important help I received is from my husband. He has always been very supportive. Whatever I needed, he would dash out to get it without asking a word,...
5 Ways to Breastfeed in Public Successfully

5 Ways to Breastfeed in Public Successfully

Breastfeeding is a beautiful thing – but comfort levels still vary for mothers when it comes to breastfeeding in public. Fortunately, there are ways that you can breastfeed your child confidently in public. At Annee Matthew, we believe that you should be able to do so boldly and without shame, but we are aware that sometimes the environment isn’t as nurturing or supportive of breastfeeding as it should be! So here are some tips that might help you out when you need to feed your baby in public: 1. What you wear matters Choose clothes that are comfortable to breastfeed in – like nursing tops that are specially designed for easy access, so you don’t have to struggle with your clothes in public. The process should be smooth and easy. As nursing tops have clever nursing access points hidden in the design, they are still aesthetically pleasing, while being very functional. Without resorting to oversized tees or ill-fitting tops, your confidence goes a long way in helping you to breastfeed in public. 2. Consider accessories to help you out Use a sling or even a wrap. With a bit of practice, you will be able to breastfeed your child in most wraps or slings and the fabric of the baby carrier has the dual function of covering your baby and your breast. You can even walk around while you are breastfeeding. 3. Get a bra that’s supportive yet easy to manage Choose a bra that is easy to remove. Other than nursing bras, which are specially designed for breastfeeding, a lot of mothers also find that a stretchy sports bra works...
How Many Nursing Tops Do You Need?

How Many Nursing Tops Do You Need?

Building a post-pregnancy wardrobe doesn’t mean you have to spend a pretty penny, especially if you plan ahead and think about how many nursing tops you truly need. Not only will planning save you money, choosing wisely will also mean that these tops can be incorporated into your post-breastfeeding wardrobe, if you take care to pick tops that suit your overall style and aesthetic. Do I even need a nursing top? To be honest, if you continue to wear ‘normal’ clothes, like oversized t-shirts, or even loose, flowing clothes – nursing is still possible. However, these clothes are not cut for nursing. This means that giving your baby breastfeeding access might be awkward or even end up damaging your clothes, like when you repeatedly tug at your straps or collar, or when you lift your T-shirt up from the bottom, exposing yourself unnecessarily. Oversized, shapeless clothes are unflattering, and for stylish mamas like you, we know how not looking your best might make you lose confidence, no matter how confident you really are about yourself. So how many nursing tops do you need? Before we go into how many nursing tops you really need, you will first need to think about what to look out for in the nursing top itself. The most important factor is of course ease of accessibility, because you would not want to struggle awkwardly with your top when feeding your baby. There are a few ways nursing tops give nursing access – from the neckline, from an empire cut, and from the center. The Alana Summer Tier Nursing Dress – Empire nursing access Then, there...
10 Advantages of Wearing a Nursing Bra

10 Advantages of Wearing a Nursing Bra

What’s the difference between a normal bra and a nursing bra? In this article, we explore why a nursing bra is essential for your optimal comfort while breastfeeding. Are you pregnant or nursing? Then you should be familiar with the discomfort and irritation of wearing your everyday, pre-pregnancy bra. Perhaps they just don’t fit well anymore – or your favourite lace bras now just chafe and cause irritation. Because unlike a nursing bra, which is designed for nursing women, ordinary bras do not have the capacity to accommodate changes that happen to your breasts while pregnant and nursing, such as size and sensitivity. So it’s now time to take a leap into the world of nursing bras! If you’re still on the fence, or researching which are the best nursing bras to look out for, we’ve compiled a list of benefits of wearing a nursing bra instead of an ordinary bra: 1. Comfort Nursing bras do not have an underwire, yet are still able to support your breasts. This is unlike ordinary bras, which often come with an under-wire for support and becomes punishing for your breasts, as they press against the soft tissue, leading to aches and swells. Additionally, the bras have a comfortable cotton underlining, reducing sensitivity caused by chafing against rough fabric, and cover a larger surface area. 2. Good health While research is yet to be conclusive, experts suggest that the under-wire in ordinary bras may apply excess pressure on the milk ducts, effectively blocking them. This may cause mastitis, a condition that is often extremely uncomfortable. Nursing bras have the dual benefit of being both...
10 Essentials For Your Post-Pregnancy Wardrobe

10 Essentials For Your Post-Pregnancy Wardrobe

Becoming a new mom is one of the most exciting times in a woman’s life. For most, being pregnant is a glowing reminder of the beautiful new life that will soon change your world forever. However, after baby is born, there’s a certain reality that sets in with regard to how you look and feel about yourself. It takes weeks or even months to get your pre-baby body back in shape and back into your old clothes. Many new moms find it extrememly difficult to figure out the best way to handle this transition period. Here are ten essential items that every mom should include in her post-pregnancy wardrobe that will have her feeling like her beautifully confident self.   1. Nursing Bra Once your baby arrives and you begin to nurse, your breasts will need lots of support. You’ll want a nursing bra that is easy to use and comfortable to wear. You’ll fluctuate in size depending on how much milk you produce and how often you feed, so flexibility is important. A good nursing bra should have cup flaps that are easily opened and closed with one hand, and allow enough space for your baby to feed without restrictions. In addition, it’s crucial to have a nursing bra that does not squeeze the breasts as this could interrupt milk production and cause discomfort throughout the day. 2. Postpartum Shapewear Many new moms find it less than desirable to look down and see that postpartum pouch that is present after the birth of their baby. While it’s unrealistic and way too harsh on yourself to expect your body to...
Elena’s Breastfeeding Journey

Elena’s Breastfeeding Journey

This is a re-post from Elena’s blog, pregnantinpittsburgh.wordpress.com. Today I’m going to talk about breastfeeding – specifically, my first experience with breastfeeding. Now before you being reading this post, which (WARNING) is more like a short essay, I just want you to know that this was my experience with breastfeeding my first time around. It may not be your experience – whether it be your first time or second time or whatever, but for those of you have have not entered the world of breastfeeding before, I just wanted you to get a taste of what one person experienced. Now, without further ado … My adventures with breastfeeding began about one hour after my son, Benjamin, was born via c-section, or about two-thirty in the morning on a Thursday. I was wheeled out of surgery into the empty post-op area and the nurse on staff asked, “Are you breastfeeding?” That was my plan, so I told her, “Yes,” and the next thing I knew, my gown was folded down and there was a new little creature sucking on my boob. In hindsight, the truth of the matter is I do not think Benjamin was sucking at all. From what I recall, he was doing more sleeping than eating. After the nurse left, my husband asked, “How does that feel?” I replied, “I don’t know. Weird I guess. I don’t know what this is supposed to feel like…it’s just interesting.” Interesting was how I described it at that time, but that did not last long. Soon after I quickly began using other words: painful, awful, torturous! That’s actually why I started writing about the experience...
10 Things to Buy for a Baby Shower

10 Things to Buy for a Baby Shower

Your friend is about give birth to a lovely bundle of joy, and is throwing a baby shower. You’re now in the market for things to buy for a baby shower. What’s a great gift you can give to your friend and/or her baby, that will be both useful, fun, or just plain bring a smile to their faces? Here at Annee Matthew we’ve put together a list of some gifts you can buy for a baby shower: 1.   Lamaze Play and Grow, Freddie the Firefly, US$15.21 New parents swear by it – this toy can simultaneously fascinate, stimulate and soothe babies at the same time. Suitable for newborns to 24 months. 2. My Pillow Pets Snuggly Puppy, US$10.99 Every baby has their favourite pillow – and this might become their new favourite, well into childhood. Comfortable for baby to snuggle and lie on, at any age. 3.  Moleskine Baby Journal, US$19.95 For the meticulous mom, this notebook helps you to keep all her notes and thoughts about her pregnancy and when baby arrives, up to the first two years of baby’s arrival. Includes task lists, wish list, growth charts, downloadable feeding tables, special moments, health, care and more. 4.  Aden + Anais Muslin Swaddle, $79.90 Baby sleeps pretty in his or her swaddle blanket. Perfect for hot Singapore weather as the fabric is breathable and will keep baby just warm enough. Comes in a pack of 4. 5. Le Petit Society, Sprinkles top We found this super adorable baby clothes label for your friend’s baby. For the style conscious mama and soon to be stylish baby. 6. Changing pad cover,...
10 Foods to Avoid while Breastfeeding

10 Foods to Avoid while Breastfeeding

Why Breastfeeding is Important Breast or bottle? For those who choose breastfeeding, the benefits for both mother and child are numerous. Bonding, perfect nutrition for the infant, and helping to prevent breast cancer in mother and infant – these are just some of the benefits that come with nursing. But extra care should taken when creating a diet for yourself as you breastfeed, to ensure the best for both yourself and your baby. Your milk is what you eat – there are some foods that should be avoided while breastfeeding, as often what you eat gets transferred directly to your baby via your breast milk. Here are 10 foods that breastfeeding mothers should be careful in consuming: 1. Any foods containing caffeine When consuming caffeine, these chemicals can cause sleeplessness in your infant, which in turn can cause crankiness and other kinds of sleep disorders. Because of its potency, caffeine isn’t secreted out of the digestive system. Caffeine also causes intestinal irritation, since an infant’s digestive system isn’t fully developed yet. If you must consume caffeinated products, make sure there’s ample time to allow your body to process it out of your system (about 6 hours). 2. Peppermint or Parsley Any kind of food that contains mint can potentially reduce milk supply.  This includes herbal remedies or herbal tea which contain mint.  Large amounts of consumption can greatly affect milk secretion, which wouldn’t be great during a period of growth spurt for your baby. One or two peppermint drops should be fine, if you must have mint candy, but no more than that. 3. Gas-inducing vegetables Gas in full grown...
Elena’s Story: Breastfeeding is Like Training for a Marathon

Elena’s Story: Breastfeeding is Like Training for a Marathon

This is a repost from Elena’s blog, Pregnant in Pittsburgh. A long time ago I said, “the first two weeks of breastfeeding are so awful and challenging that if you survive, I think your doctor should send you a medal.” (That’s not even a joke, I think a medal would be cool and trust me, you would totally deserve it!) And I still believe it. If you even attempt breastfeeding, you should get a medal. It is hard work. And after reaching and surpassing my one year breastfeeding goal, I’m here to tell you something I else I learned over the past year: breastfeeding is exactly like training for a marathon. Now I’m really hoping that last statement sends everyone up in arms because I just want to confirm for you, before you think I’m crazy, that I have run a marathon and I didbreastfeed a baby for a year (you can even read all about my marathon training here [where I raised over $5k for St. Jude’s thankyouverymuch]) and let me assure you, seriously, they are the same: When I was training for the marathon, I had to get up many times at some ridiculous hours, just to get in my training runs. In fact, I remember getting up at 4 or 5am frequently and guess what? I did the same exact thing for my breastfed baby (even more actually). When I was training for the marathon, there were many times where I thought, “Why the heck am I doing this?” And over the past year, let me assure you, I had many days where I thought the same thing of breastfeeding my baby. When I was training for the marathon,...

Use TOPS20 for extra 20% off all nursing tops. No delivery 23-28 May. Delivery will resume on May 29. Dismiss