Chronicles of a stay home mum

Chronicles of a stay home mum

Chronicles of a stay home mum   Having 2 small kids at home is no joking matter. In fact, on most days, it is very tiring and very exhausting unless, they are at grandma’s. Being a mum needs a lot of creativity to stay sane and, not to mention alive and still walking, at the end of the day.   I used to work in marketing for a MNC which requires a lot of traveling. I had to handle almost 300 personnel and tend to their needs. I’m used to making sales presentations and entertaining until wee hours in the morning but, nothing prepares me for the amount of responsibilities that I have to shoulder as a full time mum.   So here are my survival tips for any stay home mums out there (or those that plan to be one) in no whatsoever order… LEARN TO LOVE READING Kids just love to be read to. They will soak up any bedtime stories. Bearing in mind that their choice of bedtime stories may not be exactly your cup of tea, you must learn to love reading. I mean really love it with all your heart so, when you read, you will not be the first to yawn! The trick is to inject animation into the reading so, they will stay interested (hopefully interested enough to want to read on their own one day) and most importantly, to keep yourself awake!   LEARN TO VISIT THE LIBRARY You have no idea what kind of questions they can come up with. To avoid making up stories (which is a no-no) or...
9 Quick Breastfeeding Tips for First Time Moms

9 Quick Breastfeeding Tips for First Time Moms

By Susan Tanner   New mothers may find breastfeeding confusing at first. You may not know exactly what to do or how to do it. Hopefully these breastfeeding tips will help to get you started.   * Start Early – It is good to begin breastfeeding within an hour after birth if possible, when your baby is alert and the instinct to suck is strong. Although you will not yet be producing milk, your breasts contain colostrum, a thin milky fluid that contains important antibodies to disease. * Feed Frequently – You should try breastfeeding your baby at least every two to three hours. This will help to keep your breasts soft and lessen or even prevent engorgement. Watch for signs that your baby is hungry, such as changes in facial expressions, sucking sounds or lip movements, and rapid eye movement or restlessness during light naps. If you keep an eye out for these signs, you can learn to anticipate your baby’s hunger. Breastfeeding on cue will help stimulate your breasts to produce more milk. * Good Positioning – Having the right positioning for breastfeeding will play a major role in reducing nipple soreness. Use you hand to support the baby’s neck. The baby’s mouth should be open wide with the lips puckered out like “fish lips”, not folded in. The nipple should go back as far into his or her mouth as possible. If you need help finding the proper positioning, ask a nurse, midwife, or other experienced mother for some help breastfeeding. * Nipple Upkeep – When you first begin breastfeeding your nipples may become very sore....
Breasts engorgement : What to expect

Breasts engorgement : What to expect

Adapted from whattoexpect.com Right after you give birth, your hormones undergo a major shift — say bye-bye to estrogen and progesterone, and hello to prolactin, the milk-producing hormone. This change causes your postpartum breasts to grow even bigger (is this possible?) and more tender (more tender?!!) than they were during pregnancy. Welcome to the world of engorgement, which begins around two to five days after delivery whether you’re planning to nurse or not. The sinister side effects: rock-hard breasts that are swollen and wickedly uncomfortable. This is pain with a gain, though, since engorgement is a sign that your breasts are filling up with the milk your baby needs. The increased blood flow to your breasts (necessary to get the milk-producing factory up and running) is also adding to the pain and swelling. WILL ENGORGEMENT EVER END? Fortunately, engorgement is temporary, and assuming you get started breastfeeding right away (the earlier the better for relief), the pain and hardness should diminish within two to three days. By the time your baby and your breasts devise a good supply-and-demand relationship (usually within a few weeks), the engorgement will have diminished completely. If you’re not nursing, it’ll decrease within a few days. WHAT TO DO ABOUT BREAST ENGORGEMENT IF YOU’RE NURSING. Until your milk supply-and-demand cycle is well established, take these steps to minimize discomfort: Feed your baby frequently (every two to three hours) to encourage the demand to keep up with the supply. The less your baby feeds, the more engorged your breasts will become. The more your baby feeds, the quicker engorgement will pass (pretty strong motivation, right?). Place...
Sagging breasts? Is it due to pregnancy or breastfeeding?

Sagging breasts? Is it due to pregnancy or breastfeeding?

Adapted from babycenter.co.uk Many women think that breastfeeding causes your breasts to become saggy. It’s pregnancy, rather than breastfeeding, that may cause your breasts to change in size and shape after having a baby. Other reasons why breasts may appear more saggy after you’ve have a baby are if you: have a high body mass index (raised BMI) have had multiple pregnancies are an older mom had a large pre-pregnancy bra size a smoker Your breasts don’t contain any muscles. They are attached to the muscles of your chest wall by thin bands (Cooper’s ligaments). These bands aren’t very taut, which is why your breasts are able to move around. When you become pregnant, your breasts will go through a number of changes. They will become larger as they prepare for breastfeeding, while your nipples and the skin surrounding them (the areola) may darken in colour. Several days after your baby arrives, your breasts will become fuller and heavier. This is caused by the blood supply increasing to your breasts, and your milk coming in. As your breasts increase in size, the ligaments that support them may stretch. It’s this stretching that may lead to slightly saggier breasts. This change will happen regardless of whether or not you breastfeed your baby. A week or two after your baby arrives, your breasts should return to roughly the size they were during pregnancy. They’ll stay that way until you’ve been breastfeeding for about 15 months, or when you stop breastfeeding. When you return to your pre-pregnancy weight, your breasts will probably return to their pre-pregnancy size, too. Your breasts may not be quite as perky...
10 Tips to Get Back Into Shape After Childbirth

10 Tips to Get Back Into Shape After Childbirth

by: Janice Elizabeth Small You have just given birth and you want to get back into shape. Here are some tips: Be especially kind to yourself in the first weeks after your baby is born. Your body has gone through huge changes and it’s unrealistic to expect that you can snap back into your old shape straight away. Unrealistic expectations sets you up for failure and disappointment, but you CAN get your figure back if you are patient and take it one step at a time. Forget drastic dieting and treat your body to healthy nourishing food and gentle exercise to get back in shape. You will naturally lose some weight during the first few weeks as your uterus shrinks. Breast feeding alone will allow you to lose weight at 1lb a week if you eat normally and healthily as it uses up 500 calories a day, but you do need to eat enough so that your milk does not dry up. Plan on losing the remainder at a gentle pace. Your tummy will look very sad after the birth, flabby and saggy. Don’t worry you can soon get things looking good again. Do all the post-natal exercises and gentle exercise recommended by your health-care professionals during the first 6 weeks to get your tummy back in shape. After that check with them that it is Ok if you want to embark on a more strenuous exercise routine. Once your doctor says its OK to exercise, one of the best ways to retighten your muscles is a simple yoga move. Stand with your feet apart, hands on thighs. Breathe...
Stretch Marks & Skin Changes in Pregnancy

Stretch Marks & Skin Changes in Pregnancy

by Sharon Hopkins There are countless physical changes to your skin, both pleasurable and painful attributed to your pregnancy only. The common skin change that most pregnant woman experience is stretch marks. Stretch marks are separations of the outer layers of skin caused by the overstretching of underlying layers. The most commonly affected areas by stretch marks are hips, abdomen, breasts, thighs and buttocks. Stretch marks are itchy reddish marks. In pregnancy, heredity plays an important role in determining who will have and will not have stretch marks. If your mother has had them, chances are that you will get them too. There is no sure shot remedy for stretch marks, though some do fade after delivery. The only way to avoid stretch marks is to prevent them. We recommend the following – – Massage vitamin E or olive oil on the abdomen areas from the start of your pregnancy. Massage it liberally over the marks after a shower. In case you skip a shower, clean the area with a wet cloth and then apply the oil. – Regular exercise helps to tone your muscles and keep your skin firm. – Maintain healthy diet and drink plenty of water. Plenty of proteins and vitamin C & E foods should be included in your diet. Increase your intake of minerals such as zinc and silica to maintain healthy skin. – One ounce of sweet almond or jojoba oil with 7-8 drops of lavender and chamomile oils is a good homemade recipe. – Avoid excessive weight gain in a short time span. – Cocoa butter reduces stretch marks and helps to...
How to Get Your Children to Bed on Time Without Any Fuss

How to Get Your Children to Bed on Time Without Any Fuss

by Steve Hill Many parents find trying to get their child to bed at night to be one big struggle. The child may play up, whinge and even cry. When in bed, the child may then repeatedly keep getting out of bed and coming downstairs. This article gives advice on how to successfully get your child into bed at night, without all of this fuss. Some children even though they know that they are tired, do not want to miss out on any of the action or excitement. They want to spend as much time with mom and dad as possible. They can even see the fact that they have to go to bed before their parents as unjust and even cruel. These types of children will want to disrupt and even avoid going to bed at all cost. I myself have two young children and have been through this experience myself. My daughter especially needs her sleep and can be very moody in the mornings, if she has not had a particular amount of hours of it. As a parent it can become very frustrating as well as upsetting when you see your child crying because they do not want to go to bed. Comments like, please dad just one more program on the television, were far too regular, and at times I felt like backing down. I have now learnt via reading many books on parenting, how to best deal with this situation. Each child now has a set time when they have to be in bed by. This is a time that they have both agreed...
5 Things Every New Mum Needs to Know

5 Things Every New Mum Needs to Know

Congratulations on your new baby! And no, this is not a list of more to-dos. Just 5 gentle reminders for some new mum sanity and support: You may not get it right the first time. And that’s okay. Every thing from breastfeeding to bathing your baby to sleep training them… Don’t expect yourself to nail it right away. Allow yourself time to learn and to get the hang of it. Setting too-high expectations may only backfire! If you want some inspiration for breastfeeding, Racheal’s story of perseverance and determination has inspired many! Parent the way you want to. You don’t have to meet anyone’s expectations. As a first-time mother, the pressures of listening to all the well-wishers around you can be overwhelming. What your mother is telling you, your grandmother, your doctor, your friends… the list goes on. Ultimately, as long as you have done some reasonable preparation and research, just go with what feels right to you. Most of parenthood is really making it up as you go along! As long as baby is warm, clothed, and fed, especially in the early days, trust me, you’re doing a GREAT job. Hold your baby as much as you want. You won’t be spoiling your baby by holding him or her as long as you want. You can definitely spoil a toddler or a teenager. Some days you may start doubting every single decision that led up to this moment. One of the most damaging things is setting up expectations of having ‘maternal instincts’ kick in immediately. Every woman is different. Some fall in love immediately, while others grow into...
5 Things to Eat While Breastfeeding

5 Things to Eat While Breastfeeding

First of all, eat for your health. A healthy mama is a healthy child! So don’t count calories and be too worried about losing weight – all of the weight will drop off over time with breastfeeding and moderate exercise. Also, with all the toxins and chemicals found in food these days, it’s good to go for food options that contain fewer pesticides. “As of 2011 the “dirty dozen” that tested highest for pesticides, according to the Environmental Working Group, were apples, celery, strawberries, peaches, spinach, imported nectarines and grapes, sweet bell peppers, potatoes, blueberries, lettuce, and kale and collard greens.” Here are some things you can include in your diet: Fish – but be picky about it. It’s important to get protein from a wide range of sources, including fish. A fish promotes a healthy heart, as it contains DHA, EPA, and omega-3 fats. Not only that, they also play an important role in your baby’s brain and eye development during the first year. Your baby will soak up all the goodness through your breast milk. Plus, lower levels of DHA has been linked to postpartum depression in new mothers. Some types of fish and seafood you can eat are: salmon, shrimp, canned light tuna, tilapia, crab, catfish and scallops. Alternatively, you can take an omega-3 supplement if you aren’t a fan of seafood. Talk to your doctor about the recommended amount you should take. However, it’s also wise to be aware of fish that contains high level of mercury, like shark, swordfish and king mackerel. Mercury is harmful to nursing women and children, so make sure to steer clear! Water....
3 Best Breast Cancer Prevention Tips for your 30’s

3 Best Breast Cancer Prevention Tips for your 30’s

Of all breast cancer cases, 15% of women who develop it have family members who have been diagnosed with it before. That means a whopping 85% of it develop breast cancer from factors other than heredity, such as bad eating habits, environmental toxins and stress.   Breast Cancer Prevention Tips for Your 30s There are increasing numbers of women under 40 years old have being diagnosed with breast cancer in the last four decades due to preventable factors. Did you know that, according to the University of Columbia, roughly 95% of all cancers are due to bad diet and the accumulation of toxins? Breast Cancer Prevention Tip #1: Perfect time to get back into healthy habits. Many people often pick up bad habits in their teens and 20’s, like eating junk food, consuming too much sugar and caffeine. Luckily, it’s not too late! Your 30’s  is the perfect time to start picking up those healthy habits that will pay off for you later on. These include eating less sugar, adding more veggies into your diet, incorporating organic proteins, and choosing healthy fats such as Omega 3 oils. Also, lowering your consumption of alcohol and drinking more fresh, pure water. It’s also essential to develop a self-nurturing routine that incorporates stress-reduction techniques such as meditation and healthy forms of exercise. Breast Cancer Prevention Tip #2: Cut back on the toxins. In our society today, toxins are all around us even though they aren’t visible to us. They exist in our food and beauty products. Choose organic whenever you can: especially your food sources – the things you consume and put directly onto your skin. Learn about how...
5 Reasons Why You’re Experiencing Pregnancy Fatigue – And What You Can Do

5 Reasons Why You’re Experiencing Pregnancy Fatigue – And What You Can Do

Are you in your last trimester? Then this article is for you. The final trimester brings with it a lot of emotions, like excitement for the new baby, some anxiety – and probably even ‘I can’t wait for it to be over!’ After all, you may be feeling huge, need to pee all the time, and in general, just over being pregnant. One major thing that many women experience at this stage is pregnancy fatigue. Fatigue and loss of sleep is particularly common in the last trimester for a few reasons: 1 Braxton-Hicks Contractions It’s your body’s way of warming up for the actual event. These contractions are usually not very strong, but they can come and go at any time and are unpredictable. When they happen, you may wake up in the middle of the night with a rock hard belly and may leave you breathless! What you can do While there’s nothing much you can do about it except to ride it out, you can try to relax and simply know that it’s your body doing what it needs to do to prepare you for labour. However, you can keep timing those contractions to see how far apart they are, to make sure they’re not actual contractions leading you into labor. 2  Constant need to pee At this stage, the baby has dropped into your pelvis, putting pressure on your bladder, leaving less room for your urine. This means that you’ll be needing to pee more often, and getting up frequently in the middle of the night. What you can do Even though you know you’ll be...
Regular Nursing Bra or Nursing Sports Bra?

Regular Nursing Bra or Nursing Sports Bra?

Breastfeeding moms would probably agree that having great support and comfort is essential for breastfeeding success. No pokey wires or uncomfortable fabrics – the process can be eased by picking a great bra that is not only comfortable, but gives you an easy breastfeeding experience. Are you thinking of which nursing bra you should invest in? Here are some considerations: Your lifestyle. Are you constantly on the go? Heading from the gym straight to grocery shopping? Activewear will probably be the better investment for you. Our yoga sports looks great under t-shirts, yet will still give you great support and freedom of movement. Your sense of style. What are the tops you usually like to wear? If you like form fitting clothes where your bust line comes into focus, then a great option is our classic nursing bra. Comes in a variety of colours that can be hidden under your top, or play a flirty peekaboo with them if you pick a candy colour. The classic nude bra is a wardrobe staple that will look great under more conservative work tops or white tank tops. Durability. Both bras are highly durable, but if you want a bra that you can toss into the washing machine without a second thought, it would be the yoga sports bra. Not only does it withstand multiple washes easily, our moms report that they keep their shape even after six months. Bust size. Our classic nursing bra comes with a bra strap extender, that can accommodate even the most well-endowed mama among you. However, for those who need an added boost of support, the yoga sports...
5 Tips for Early Breastfeeding Success

5 Tips for Early Breastfeeding Success

Did you know that your earliest experiences with your baby will help you in a successful breastfeeding journey? Here are some tips that may help: Skin to skin contact immediately after delivery. This is the ‘golden hour’, where you can immediately bond with your baby. It is ideal for you to have skin-on-skin contact with you until the first time you breastfeed or at least during that first hour. Let your family know that they may have to wait a for that hour before they can hold the new baby. Allow yourself to enjoy your baby! Talk to your healthcare providers to ensure that this is followed, and find out what their standard procedure is. It’s good to be prepared beforehand. When your baby shows signs of hunger, like smacking their lips or gnawing at their hands, breastfeed them. It’s not possible to feed your baby too often. In fact, the more you feed them, the more milk you will produce. To keep your supply up, do it as often as you can. Delay the first bath. Arrange for a bath only after at least 6 to 8 hours. Unless there is a reason to bathe them for infection reasons, delaying the first bath time helps baby maintain a higher body temperature, as well as better blood sugars. They will also cry less. Keep baby in the same room as you. For this, it’s important to check with your healthcare providers and birth professionals on what the protocol is. Keeping baby in the same room as you gives you easy access to your baby and helps with the early bonding process....
How to Care for Your Nursing Bras

How to Care for Your Nursing Bras

So you just got some brand new nursing bras – great! Did you know that by caring for them well, you can prolong their life span? Make them work for you throughout your breastfeeding years and even beyond by following a few simple tips. 1 Machine wash cold, gentle cycle. Wash before wearing. Nylon and spandex don’t shrink, but bras made out of cotton may shrink on their first wash. So make sure you know what fabric your bras are made of! Annee Matthew bras are made of nylon and spandex so there will be no shrinkage. But washing in cold water can help to preserve colors as well as delicate fabrics. As bras are smaller and more delicate, cold water is a good option. 2 Remove bra pads before washing. This is so that your bras won’t lose their shape. Ideally, the bra pads should be washed by hand, but if you must wash them in a machine… 3 Be sure to use a a lingerie bag. A lingerie bag will help to prevent hooks and straps from snagging and catching onto other items of clothing. This will also prevent them from stretching when being tumbled around in the machine. 4 Hang them out to dry It’s important not to use a dryer as it’s a harsh environment that will cause your bras to fade, stretch and lose their shape easily. So whenever possible, hang them out to dry. 5 Store them well Many women tend to store their bras by folding them into half and inverting one cup into the other. This will actually cause the bra cups...
Bra Buying Tips for Breast Cancer Survivors

Bra Buying Tips for Breast Cancer Survivors

In honour of Breast Cancer Awareness month, we’re sharing tips and stories all month on breast health and issues related to breast cancer. For those who are undergoing treatment for breast cancer, who have just come out of treatment, or are survivors of breast cancer, you may have different needs when it comes to buying a bra. Here are some tips for bra shopping: Get the right fit.  Did you know that most women are walking around with the wrong bra size, statistically speaking? Many don’t know that their breast sizes have changed since the last time they got themselves fitted, or are not sure what a good fit feels like. It’s good to try on a range of sizes and get the help of a professional lingerie store / bra fitting assistant to see what works for you currently. Don’t be shy – these people have seen it all when it comes to breasts. The important thing is to make your own comfort a priority. Bra extenders Choose broad and comfortable straps. Straps that are broad allow for a greater distribution of weight and will not dig into your shoulders. This helps to reduce the risk of Lymphodema, especially important for those who have had mastectomy or lymph nodes removed. Check also for the tightness of the band around your rib cage – are they too tight or digging into your flesh? Getting bra extenders could also help with this issue. How does the support feel?  Good support means that when you move, walk or even run, your breasts are held firmly without being too restricting or tight....
Effective Parenting Techniques: How to Use Time Outs

Effective Parenting Techniques: How to Use Time Outs

adapted from an article by Henrietta Joyce If your children have reached toddler age, by now you should be aware of the classic toddler tantrum. Arms and legs thrashing around, laying on the floor and screaming blue murder. Your anger rises. What to do at this moment? Well, it’s possible to stay calm and to mete out discipline techniques that are safe for your child – and you. Time out is a tactic that is often used by parents, and here are some tips for using it effectively. Be Consistent Make sure that your child knows that you always follow through. Time out is most effective for children from three to six years old. For petty behavior that you would like to correct, time out is effective because small children hate being ignored! This allows your child to calm down and communicates to them that their behavior is not desirable. Time out is only effective when: · The adult remains calm · The child understands in advance about Time Out · It is viewed as a calming measure · It is not over used Here are some other guidelines: Children must be told clearly which behaviours lead to Time Out. Parent cannot change the rules on a whim or when they are angry. For example if the rules are Time Out is used for biting, hitting and throwing things you cannot decide to send your child to Time out for refusing to eat her carrots at meal time. Remind her that Time Out is a way of helping her to calm down and behave better. Children should be shown where...
Importance and Benefits of Post Partum Belts

Importance and Benefits of Post Partum Belts

Anyone who has gone through childbirth will know that it’s a physically taxing event. During this undoubtedly beautiful and miraculous process, your body goes through a lot of changes – your abdominal muscles and your pelvic area is stretched, pulled and pushed in order to deliver your baby. Even delivery via C-section requires a healing process where your abdominal area needs as much support and care as possible. “When I was in labor, I felt there was a huge ball of stone inside me, rolling from side to side. No sooner was my baby out than I felt totally drained and light of body. A few hours later, when I took my first step after the delivery, I felt as if I was floating and thought my stomach would hit the floor because it felt all loose and flabby. My mother was quick to reassure me that it was normal to feel that way and that ‘belly binding’ would bring it back to its old shape…” from yourkidandyou.com Postpartum belt – long 1 Postpartum belts offer great support.  Not only will belts help to support your stomach and abs, it will alleviate the pressure on your lower back. Childbirth causes stress on the lower back, which can continue if you are breastfeeding. By helping you to sit up straighter, not slouch and maintain a better posture, it can also help prevent lower back ache. As an added bonus, it can also help your stomach regain a flatter appearance. 2 Reduces stretch marks and improves recovery time. Belly binding is believed to be reduce the appearance of stretch marks as it helps to hold...
8 Foods to Avoid During Breastfeeding

8 Foods to Avoid During Breastfeeding

While breastfeeding, whatever you eat, your baby eats too. Consult with your doctor about your diet, to ensure your baby is getting the best possible nutrition from your breastmilk. Here are some foods to avoid during breastfeeding. 8 Foods to Avoid During Breastfeeding 1 High Mercury Fish These include fish like king mackerel, swordfish and shark, which include high levels of mercury. Mercury is a neurotoxin that can affect your baby’s brain functioning. Try eating seafood like catfish, salmon and canned light tuna that contain healthy essential oils which are good for both you and the baby. 2 Tea / Coffee Drinking more than 2 – 3 cups of coffee a day could lead to high levels of caffeine in your body, which may in turn affect the caffeine level in your breastmilk! Babies ingesting caffeine could lead to fussiness and sleep interruption. The level of tannin (caffeine found in tea) varies, so you will have to watch your intake accordingly. Try switching instead to naturally non-caffeinated herbal teas like chamomile and nettle, which are gentle and soothing. These teas also help with breastfeeding issues, such as low milk supply and help to calm teething babies. 3 Alcohol Babies consuming alcohol through breastmilk could potentially have their growth and sleep patterns affected. It doesn’t mean that you can’t have any fun at all though! If you do drink, just wait for at least two hours before feeding your baby. Prepare for a night out by storing up excess breast milk to feed your baby with later. 4 Citrus Fruits Citrus fruits could cause fussiness, diaper rash and gastrointestinal refluxes....
Are you pumping breast milk? 7 Tips for Success

Are you pumping breast milk? 7 Tips for Success

Whatever your reasons for pumping breast milk, it’s important to get started on the right foot. This starts with knowing your objectives and creating a supportive environment for yourself. While the conversation often revolves around breast versus bottle, the reality is there is a whole spectrum between the two. You could be supplementing your feeds with expressed breast milk, or feeding your baby a combination of formula and breast milk. There isn’t one right way to do it! 7 Tips for Pumping breast milk successfully Get clear on your objectives Pumping breast milk is often the answer for a myriad of reasons. Perhaps your baby isn’t taking well to breastfeeding, or your supply is low. And you want to start pumping in order to increase your supply and supplement your baby’s diet. It is helpful to know why you’re doing it, and how long you plan to pump. Are you intending to do it just until your preemie is big enough to breastfeed directly? Or just until your milk supply increases? Or do you want to do it until your baby is ready to wean. Knowing this allows you to prepare mentally for your task ahead. Get started as early as possible Pumping breast milk right after birth is the best. There has been research that shows the more breast milk that’s removed within the first three weeks after birth, the higher and more consistent a mother’s milk supply will be. Pump as often as a newborn would be feeding at the breast – that’s every two hours! Get a good quality breast pump If you have a chance...
Breastfeeding Tips from a Lactation Consultant

Breastfeeding Tips from a Lactation Consultant

Tips adapted from 13 Breastfeeding Tips Straight from a Lactation Consultant, with tips shared by Leigh Anne O’Connor, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.  There’s so much information floating out there on breastfeeding, that we rounded up the top tips that have been shared by a lactation consultant, that are most useful and universal to breastfeeding moms. Make sure you’re comfortable The best feed happens when you and your baby are comfortable. Rather than worrying about the ‘best’ position, it’s more useful to find the most comfortable position instead. O’Connor says “The best nursing position for a mom is one where she is comfortable, not hunched over, and her baby is super close. We are all different sizes and shapes, so there is no one size fits all.” Tummy to tummy works well That said, the most common and recommended position is the one where your  tummy is in contact with baby’s tummy. This is a position where baby can breathe well and easily suckle milk from your breast. Use a cold and damp washcloth to wake baby up Snoozing through meal times? If your baby is sleeping through his or her meals, use a damp washcloth gently on baby’s neck to stimulate them into wakefulness. Empty your breast if meal is missed Not emptying your breast can lead to painful engorgement and a lowered supply. So even if baby misses their meal, make sure you express the milk by hand or by pumping it out. Make sure baby’s mouth is opened wide A good latch is important for successful breastfeeding, so make sure that your baby is close and their...
Tips for Storing Breastmilk

Tips for Storing Breastmilk

Tips for Storing Breastmilk Pumping breast milk is a lifesaver for moms who have to work or be away from their babies for an extended period of time. If you’re pumping, proper storage is key to ensure that the breast milk is safe and good for your baby to consume. As a general guideline, – Breast milk can be kept at room temperature (66 – 78degF / 18 – 25 deg Celsius) for 4 – 6 hours. In warmer climates, bacteria grows quicker so you can only keep milk at room temperature for 3 – 4 hours. – Breast milk can be kept in a fridge for 3 days safely. Keep it in the compartment that is the coolest (the chiller or the lower part of your fridge). – Breast milk can be stored in the freezer for 3 months, or 6 – 12 months if in deep freeze (under 0 degrees Celsius). Keep in mind that some loss of vitamin C and white blood cells happens in freezing, but total protein, fat, enzyme and other general antibodies/anti-infective properties remain. What to do with Frozen Breast Milk – Thaw it in the fridge, or under warm running water for a quicker thaw – Never microwave it as this could end up destroying the nutrients – After thawing, it can be kept in the fridge for up to 24 hours, or at room temperature for up to 4 hours. Other breast milk storage tips to consider: – Use glass, BPA free containers or sealable plastic bags and seal the bottles tightly. – Fill the bottles with the amount of milk...

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